Tag: Southern Belize

TROPIC AIR ANNOUNCES SCHEDULED TOUR FLIGHTS FROM PLACENCIA TO THE BLUE HOLE

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 158 1

PRESS RELEASE
San Pedro, Ambergris Caye, Belize
Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Tropic Air announces that effective November 13th, 2019 it will commence regularly scheduled air tour flights from Placencia to the Blue Hole. These new flights will initially operate on Wednesdays, will take approximately one hour, and will complement the existing scheduled Blue Hole tour flights from San Pedro, Caye Caulker and Belize City Municipal.

“For some time we have been working with our Customers in Placencia to find a way to make these flights happen”, said John E. Greif III, President of Tropic Air. “We have always offered Blue Hole charters from the South, but the time is now right to offer a scheduled flight for the growing tourism market in the peninsula. We know visitors to Placencia want the opportunity to experience Belize’s number one attraction, the way it should be seen, from the air, and we will deliver.”

Flights will depart at 11am on air conditioned Cessna Caravan 208 aircraft, seating 11 passengers in an “air tour” layout. Tropic Air is a certified tour operator and, as such, Blue Hole flights will have a pilot that is also a certified tour guide on board. Special introductory pricing will be available shortly and tours can be booked via local resorts, agents and Tropic Air.

About Tropic Air
With nearly 40 years of service, Tropic Air currently flies over 200 daily scheduled flights with 20 aircraft to 15 destinations in Belize, Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala. Tropic Air now employs over 360 team members and will carry over 300,000 passengers and 425,000 items of freight system wide this year. It has two additional aircraft on order.

Tropic Air is a member of the Latin American Airlines Association (ALTA), and recently successfully completed IATA’s Industry Standard Safety Audit for the third time, after joining the program in 2015. Tropic also won the Traveler’s Choice Award in the Specialty and Leisure Category in Latin America in the 2019 TripAdvisor Travellers’ Choice awards for Airlines.

Journalists with media enquiries, please contact the press office: pr@tropicair.com

Pictured: The Blue Hole during a Tropic Air tour. Photo © 2019 Tony Rath Photography – tonyrath.com and Tropic Air

Climb To The Summit

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 594 1

PART 1: What Do You Do In Your Spare Time?

The first thing Kenrick said when asked on Monday how it went was “It was hard this year. The Heat was extreme! Indeed, it was an extremely hot and humid weekend here in Belize, with averages in the 90s and even rising to 100F.

This year the team was made up of 12, with one guide, Benedicto. Their motto for the expedition was “We are one with Nature, life is an adventure we got to live it”. The group started out at 7.22am on Friday morning, a little later than usual as one of the new team members had a backpack that was overweight, when checked by the guide. They were all eager to make up time and walked the first part at a fast pace, knowing from experience that this was the easiest part and they wanted to get as far as they could before the heat intensified. Along the way, Lennox, our other Tropic employee tried to clear some branches blocking the path, with his machete, when a small stick hit his left knee and gashed it open and they had to perform some quick temporary first aid until they got to the camp.

The group arrived at the 12K mark on the Sittee River at around 9.20am, having made pretty good time. After, crossing the river, they all took an hour break to refuel. The heat was fierce and the lesser experienced among the group were exhausted. From this point onwards the terrain gets much harder, so it was decided that the more experienced, including our two intrepid employees Kenrick and Lennox, would forge on ahead, taking some of the weight from the kits of those less experienced.

Kenrick said, that the extra weight they were carrying and the intense heat and humidity made the trek, that much harder and the rainforest seemed denser than normal and somewhat unreal. They stopped at 17 kilometers where there is a helipad clearing, and decided to wait for the rest of the group. Here they all fell asleep for about 50 minutes but the others still had not shown, so they continued on as by now it was already 1.05pm. They arrived at 19K Base camp approx. 40 minutes later and began setting up the tents and preparing a quick noodle meal for the others. At around 4.10 only 6 of the remaining group arrived.

One of their group had felt faint from exhaustion and had to head back to Camp 12K to spend the night, with the guide Benedicto. Along the way the other six climbers had an encounter with a jaguar who crossed their paths. They were all exhilarated, excited and a little relieved when it went on its way.

Kenny discovered in the changing of backpacks, that his kit had been left behind at 16K so he and Lennox made a quick trek back to get it. By now it was getting dark and a little scary so they went as fast as they could. After showering in the river and eating they all fell asleep in their hammocks with an eight- foot Boa constrictor as their body guard, sleeping in a big hole next to them!

The following morning the guide and the other team member arrived early and the group started the climb up Heartbreak Hill, to reach the summit. The team miscalculated their water as the streams were pretty dry and at the second helipad, there was no water as usual. The group climbed for one hour and finally reached the summit at Midday. Kenny and Lennox proudly placed the Tropic flag there. The sun was unbearably hot so after about 20 minutes they started the climb back down, tired and incredibly thirsty. Kenny commented that the guide had extra water but with the heat it felt like they needed a gallon each!

Coming down was easy!! Kenny’s words. They reached camp after a couple of hours and that cold shower in the waterfall felt like the best of their lives.

The following day after a good night’s sleep and lots of story and adventure swapping, they started the trek back to Base Camp. The climbers reached at different times according to their experience and endurance level. But by 3.00 on Sunday evening everyone had arrived safely back at Base Camp. There was another jaguar encounter, this time a baby one, so the climber moved quickly on, fearing that the mother would be close by.

Climb to the Summit 2019, was a massive success despite the intensity of the heat and some of the challenges they had on the way. We would like to congratulate Kenny and Lennox on their incredible feat and wish them every success in their next adventure.

What do you do in your spare time?

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1005 2

Here at Tropic Air, we have some pretty active employees who take advantage of all that Belize has to offer. Kenrick Duncan and Lennox Myvett, customer service agents at Tropic Air’s PGIA International terminal are two such individuals. Next Friday 12th April both are taking part in the arduous hike and climb to Victoria Peak, the second highest mountain in Belize at 3.675 feet.

The three-day hike, according to Kenrick, is not for the faint hearted and requires a degree of fitness and endurance. Kenrick trains by running and both he and Lennox are no strangers to physical challenges. Just a few weeks ago in March, for the ninth year, they took part in the grueling 180-mile Ruta Maya Belize River challenge, finishing sixth in their age group and 35th overall.

The hike to Victoria Peak starts bright and early at 5.00am from the basecamp in Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary, where the team of five men, five women and a guide, set off, carrying backpacks with minimum equipment – tents, hammocks, other essentials and food. This is the third time that Kenrick and Lennox have climbed the peak so they are familiar with the routine. On the first day, they hike the 12 kilometers along mostly flat terrain reaching the first camp after crossing the Sittee River. After lunch of, according to Kenrick, mostly protein bars, because they don’t want to be hauling lots of weight, they continue to hike the rest of the trail another 7 kilometers. This is more difficult terrain with the trail going up and down. Along the way they encounter the infamous Heartbreak Hill. Once they reach their camp for the evening everyone usually takes a dip in the waterfall (which Kenny said is extremely chilly but refreshing). On Saturday, its another early start .Once the group reaches the base of Victoria Peak it’s a scramble up a rocky stream bed leading to the forest canopy. Ascending the rock gully requires rope and harness. They finally reach the peak at around 11.00am. The view from here is stunning. According to Kenrick all you see is hills and hills all around. On a clear day you can even see the coast. The area has unique flora with elfin shrubland, sphagnum moss, small trees of only two to three meters and the rare fiery-colored orchid which only grows at high elevations.

The team usually spend about thirty minutes taking in the amazing view and then it’s a climb back down and back to nineteen Kilometer camp for the evening to rest before returning to base the following day. Last year, they were extremely excited, and a little scared, to be followed by a jaguar on their trail. They also encountered several snakes along the way. Don’t worry they are prepared and the guides always carries anti-venom.

Each year, Kenrick explained the team have a name or a motto which is usually decided upon once they start the trek. In 2018 their motto was “I’m not just living, I’m alive “. To find out what their motto is for this year and to find out more about their adventures along the way stay tuned for our next blog. We all wish them good luck on their journey.

3 Guys, 48 years and Counting

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1170

Tropic Air has over 300 employees, many who have been with us for over 10 years, and some who have even been with us since our beginnings in 1979. This month we would like to introduce you to some of the people who work at our Dangriga station. Dangriga is the largest town in Southern Belize.  Here you will find a vibrant music, culture and art scene grounded in the strong influence of the Garifuna people.  Inland, the Bocawina National Park offers intense adventures such as ziplining, waterfall rappelling and hiking to Antelope Falls. The Cockscomb Basin Jaguar Preserve is also within easy driving distance. Offshore Dangriga, provides easy access to the Southern Cayes, in particular South Water Caye, Tobacco Caye and Glovers Reef Atoll, where the diving and snorkelling are spectacular.

At our Dangriga station there are three people whose combined years of service totals 48! That’s longer than Tropic has been in operation.  Let us introduce you to Derry Nasario, Stanli Pascual and Geovani Johnson.

Derry Nasario, Stanli Pascual and Geovanni Johnson

Derry Nasario has worked for Tropic for 20 years. He started working on 1st December 1997 in the San Pedro terminal as a ramp agent. After 4 years here, he made the move to Hopkins and started working at our Dangriga station in 2001. He loves the working environment at Tropic and particularly the management. In his spare time Derry likes to fish and he also likes to jog every morning, to keep fit.

Stanli Pascual has worked for Tropic for 18 years. He started in 2001 as a ramp agent. He particularly enjoys working with his co-workers and is part of the Tropic Air basketball team, The Tropic Thunders. In his spare- time he likes to clean up the environment.

Geovani Johnson has worked for Tropic for 10 years. He started working on 20th July 2008. Before that he used to work at a factory in Belmopan making orange Juice. He remembers how excited and willing to learn he was on his first day at Tropic. His favorite part about working here are his fellow co-workers. Geovani likes to lift weights and is also part of the Tropic Air basketball team. He really enjoys the welcoming, comfortable working environment of Tropic and says “it feels like family”

We are proud and thankful for having Derry, Stanli and Geovani on our team and for their years of service to Tropic Air. We hope you get to meet them and the rest of our team from our Dangriga station when getting a Tropic Air flight.

Tropic Air flies to Dangriga several times a day from the Belize City International and Municipal airports as well as Placencia and Punta Gorda. Dangriga airport is located in the northern part of town.

10 unforgettable things to do in the “forgotten” district of Toledo, Belize

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 2366

1: Visit a Maya site.

There are 5 major Maya sites in the Toledo district and many others that remain unexcavated. The most famous and easily accessible are Nim Ni Punit and Lubaantun. Pusilha, Uxbenka and Xnaheb are harder to get to and require a guide.

2: Visit a Cacao Farm

Toledo is often called “the cradle of chocolate”. There are many small subsistence family farms in the area growing cacao. Eladio Pop’s Agouti farm is one of the most famous. There are also several chocolate makers, Ixcacao, Cotton tree Chocolate and T’chil, who offer tours of their farms and demonstrate how to make chocolate.

3: Shop at Punta Gorda market

This vibrant event takes place every Wednesday and Friday. Here you can witness the Maya from the surrounding villages, selling their fresh produce among other things ginger, cacao, beans, corn, turmeric (yellow ginger), hot pepper (ground), other spices and colorful hammocks (this is probably the cheapest place to buy them in Belize)

7: Swim in Blue Creek Cave

Locally known as Hokeb Ha which means where the water enters the earth, a short hike takes you to the opening of the cave and the beautiful azure blue pool. Swimming into the cave you are enveloped in darkness of a different world

How to get to Belize

Here are a list of international carriers that fly into Belize. Click here or copy and paste the following link:

https://www.tropicair.com/flying-tropic-air/about-belize/how-do-you-get-to-belize/

The Soundtrack of Life

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 2506 0

For Andy Palacio, one of Belize’s most loved and famous musicians, music was “the soundtrack of life”.

The late Andy Palacio in concert at Y-Not Island, Dangriga. ©JCCUELLAR.COM
The late Andy Palacio in concert at Y-Not Island, Dangriga. ©JCCUELLAR.COM

Perhaps the most beautiful demonstration of this statement can be found in the music of his people, the Garinagu, one of the many cultures that make up the melting pot that is Belize. Product of the indigenous Arawaks of South America and shipwreck prisoners destined for slavery, the Garinagu claim St. Vincent as their homeland.  Forceful exodus from the Caribbean lead to Central American settlements in Honduras, Guatemala and Belize..  Throughout migratory pathways, the Garinagu have continued  to use music in daily life and work to retell their story from elder to younger generation, to diminish the boredom of everyday chores, to accompany sacred rituals that maintain intergenerational bonds and to recreate a sense of shared identity despite borders.

The main instrument used in Garifuna music that requires musical accompaniment is the drum.  Traditionally these drums were made from a hollowed out trunk of hardwood, covered with animal skin usually a deer, peccary or sheep which was stretched over the trunk and tightened with rope and wooden pegs and they were always played solely with the hands.  Today the design is very much the same, although the hollowing out is normally done with a machine rather than by hand.  In the majority of everyday secular music, two drums are involved.  The main and largest drum provides the bass and is known as the Segundo. Its namesake drummer provides the regular beat.  The Primero drum is usually smaller and its player uses a more complicated pattern of beats and is considered the more skilled musician.  In Garifuna rituals a third larger drum is used with the central instrument, the Lanigi Garawoun (the heart drum) providing the lead for the other two drummers.

Primero and Segundo Drums. ©JCCUELLAR.COM
Primero and Segundo Drums. ©JCCUELLAR.COM

For social occasions, one of the most popular music genres and dances of the Garifuna is the Punta.  This was traditionally a dance performed by men and women representing a dialogue between the two sexes performed at social gatherings and wakes.  The drums and rattles  accompanied the narrative text written mostly by women provides comment on the many challenges of  life.  Traditionally families socialized together and young people would be under strict supervision.  The Punta was a way through which couples communicated interest in each other without alarming the audience or creating suspicion.  Today couples doing the Punta try to outdo each other with complicated movements of the feet that sway the rest of the body, producing an impression of moving hips and bottoms. Other dances such as the Chumba, Gunjei, Wanaragua, Paranda and Hüngü Hüngü are often played in social settings.

This traditional Punta music has evolved into one of the most popular and ubiquitous style of music in Belize: Punta Rock.  The artist Pen Cayetano is largely regarded as the originator of this genre of music during the 1980s.  It is a faster version of traditional Punta with the addition of electric instruments such as drum, bass guitar and synthesizer and the dance accompanying it is every bit as provocative as the original. Today one of the most popular Punta artists is Supa G.

Pen Cayetano. ©JCCUELLAR.COM
Pen Cayetano. ©JCCUELLAR.COM

Paranda is another example of how the music has evolved over the years as the Garifuna have assimilated other musical influences from their surroundings.  A gentler genre of music and dance traditionally performed by the Garifuna men, Paranda songs were used as serenades in which a group of guitar-toting performers would to from house to house in their communities performing their compositions. The singing providing the narrative accompaniment is very much the call and response, leader and chorus arrangement that is typical of some music of the Garifuna and talks about what is happening in the singers’ lives. Though the musical form is known to have been around since the early 1900s, it wasn’t until 2007 when Andy Palacio elevated Paranda to international fame with his acclaimed CD, “Watina”.  After his unexpected death,  the Garifuna collective, the group with which Andy had toured to promote Watina, continued to build on his legacy,  creating a reputation for this more soulful exploration of Garifuna music.

The Wanaragua provides yet another “soundtrack to life”.  Otherwise known as the Jonkonnu or John Canoe,  the traditional dance is thought to have been created or adopted on the island of St. Vincent.  Similar dances created by the slaves were performed on special occasions around Christmas; however, oral history refers to Wanaragua dancers using a guise lo lure European colonizers into Garifuna communities during the wars they fought on the island of St. Vincent in the 17th century.  Today the dance is usually performed between  Christmas Day and Día Rey, January 6th or the feast of the epiphany.  Accompanied by drumming, performers dress up in  pink masks as a mocking representative of Europeans  and dance from house to house for a small monetary token.

Wanaragua Dancer in Dangriga. ©JCCUELLAR.COM
Wanaragua Dancer in Dangriga. ©JCCUELLAR.COM

Whilst the majority of Garinagu are located in the Stann Creek district around Dangriga and Hopkins and in Barranco in the Toledo district, any visitor to Belize is sure to encounter one of the above genres of music and dance particularly around November as they celebrate the uniqueness of their culture and soundtrack of their life.

Want to experience the sounds and sights of the Garifuna culture? Then book your flight with Tropic Air and take a trip this November 19th to beautiful Dangriga.

A sweet treat for May

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1780 0

DATES FOR THIS YEAR’S (2017) CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL ARE MAY 19TH, 20TH, 21ST.

This month is a very special one for the Toledo district of Belize because it marks the 10th Anniversary of the Chocolate Festival of Belize.

Back in 2007 the first festival was founded originally as the Toledo Cacao Festival, with the idea of promoting this very unique district of Belize and the amazing cacao that grows here.  The then British company Green and Black who were buying the majority of the cacao for their “Maya Gold” bar, were one of the main sponsors of the event, along with the Toledo Cacao Growers Association (TCGA).  The event opened with the signature “Wine and Chocolate” evening.  All the cuisine was chocolate related and guests were treated to bars of “Maya Gold” as a welcome gift. The following day a street fair was held in the town of Punta Gorda, the town clock was painted especially for the event.  There were stalls of all kinds selling every kind of cacao related product you could think of, wine, vinegar, soaps, earrings and of course chocolate.  Local musicians played marimba and the Maya ceremonial deer dance was re-enacted. There were activities for children to learn all about cacao and even trips to local cacao farms could be arranged. The event culminated on the Sunday with fireworks and the music of The Three Kings.

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©JCCUELLAR.COM

The Maya of the Toledo district have of course been making chocolate for thousands of years. They discovered that if the seeds grown in the pods of the Theobrama Cacao tree were roasted and ground, mixed with local spices and water, that they provided a refreshing drink. This drink originally drunk in dried gourds is still very much a part of the Maya culture although today it is more likely to be drunk from brightly colored plastic cups.  This first ever cacao event was not only a showcase of the traditional Maya culture but also an inspiration for a handful of people to start making their own “bean to bar” chocolate within Belize using Belizean cacao. By the following year there were already four new chocolate makers in Belize, showcasing their products at the 2nd Cacao Festival.  These included Belize Chocolate Company, Cotton Tree Chocolate, Goss Chocolate and Ixcacao (originally Cyrila’s)

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©JCCUELLAR.COM

The Toledo Cacao Growers Association which was established in 1984 was the original source for buying beans.  Until very recently the cacao farmer would harvest the pods, extract the beans and then ferment them in wooden boxes covered with banana leaves. This process would take approximately 7 days.  Once the beans were fermented they were laid out to dry.  The TCGA would buy these dried and fermented beans from the farmer.  In 2010, Maya Mountain Cacao started purchasing wet beans from the farmers in an effort to provide a more consistent quality to the buyer.  The TCGA quickly followed suit and today both companies centralise the fermenting and drying of the cacao.  It is at this stage that the various chocolate makers buy the beans to transform it into chocolate.

The Cacao festival changed its name in 2013 to The Chocolate Festival of Belize.  As with years gone by, this year the event will be held on the Commonwealth weekend 20th – 22nd May and will follow the same format as the original with Wine and Chocolate evening on Friday, Taste of Toledo street fair  held on the Saturday and Grand Finale on Sunday.  Come and check out what promises to be a fabulous, informative weekend filled with chocolate, culture, music and fun and of course make sure you fly there on Tropic Air.

November in Belize

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1731

Belize is a country of celebrations or jump ups as we call them and Belizeans love to party. Most months of the year have at least one holiday or anniversary commemorating or celebrating something of national significance.  In November, all of Belize celebrates Garifuna Settlement Day on the 19th of the month.  This holiday commenced in 1943 in the Stann Creek and Toledo districts of the country and in 1977 it became a national Holiday throughout Belize.

The Garinagu (plural of Garifuna) or Black Caribs first arrived in Belize, then British Honduras on November 19, 1802. They were the descendants of Carib Indians and Black Africans from St Vincent.  According to history, they arrived in dug out canoes or dories and the re- enactment, called Yurumei, has become part of the Garifuna cultural ritual that occurs every morning on November 19th.

Belize has Garifuna communities living throughout Belize with approximately 15,000 people making up 7% of the population. The highest concentration can be found in the Stann Creek district and in particular Dangriga.  The word Dangriga is from the Garifuna language meaning “sweet water”. Here the celebration lasts all week with parades, drumming, live music, dancing and much fun.  The women and men dress in their traditional and colorful clothes and a Miss Garifuna pageant is held where young ladies showcase their knowledge of traditional dancing and language. In nearby Hopkins, traditionally a small fishing village, the children still learn and speak the Garifuna language .

 

The Garifuna culture is a strong and proud one.  They have their own yellow, white and black flag symbolizing the sun, peace and the people.  The food is also different from the ubiquitous rice and beans with Hudut, bundiga and cassava bread being just some of the delicacies to be found.

Let Tropic Air fly you to experience the Garifuna culture.

Let’s go visit Toledo!

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1898 0

Toledo the southernmost district of Belize is arguably one of the richest areas of our country in terms of culture and topography.  Cradled by high mountains, dense jungle and the blue Caribbean sea, the area is abundant in nature reserves, pristine rainforests, extensive cave systems and some of the best off shore cayes and yet historically it is one of the least populated and visited.  Formerly frequented by the hardier eco traveler and backpacker,  Tropic Air’s daily scheduled flights from almost anywhere in Belize including the International airport, to Punta Gorda the areas capital ,coupled with the increase in a variety of accommodation ranging from luxury lodges to bed and breakfast inns has opened up this diverse area to the mainstream traveler. Visitors can even stay in a traditional Maya home in a thatched cottage in one of the many Maya villages.  This homestay project offers the chance to experience the Maya way of life. Food is authentic Maya fare of corn tortillas made on the fire, with corn ground on a traditional metate handed down over the centuries from family to family. This is served with caldo a tasty chicken stew with potatoes and vegetables grown on the family farm.

Deer Dance

Whilst the Toledo district like the rest of Belize, is culturally diverse, the Maya culture dominates here, more than any other area of Belize.  Some 30 villages inhabited by the Kekchi and the Mopan Maya dot the surrounding countryside. San Antonio located 25 miles outside of PG has one of the largest Mopan Maya communities in Central America and one of the centers for the annual deer dance.  Villagers wear colorful costumes and dance to marimba music.  The dance symbolizes the relationship between man and nature.  The Maya maintain a strong link to the past through rituals, folklore and family.  Fiestas dancing and traditional music remain important as several festivals and celebrations occur throughout the year.

Belize Chocolate Fetival - Wine & Chocolate NightThe most recent annual event is the Toledo Cacao Festival held in May in Punta Gorda and throughout the district.  Activities range from a wine and chocolate tasting evening to cookery competitions and a craft fair, trips to the outer Cayes and a cacao trail tour in Toledo’s chocolate country.
Other festivals in the district include the feast of San Luis during Easter, Garifuna settlement Day and the East Indian Festivals.  In October The Tide fish fest is a weekend annual event dedicated to raising awareness of environmental issues.  The weekend consists of a seafood gala with delicious food on offer, a youth conservation competition and a fishing tournament.

Annual TIDE Fish Festival

In November the Battle of the drums showcases local musicians as they display their talents in 5 different categories of Garifuna drumming.