Category: Food

Queen Conch in Belize

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 999

As we discovered in a previous blog, everything is not always as it seems.  Cashew nut is in fact a fruit and chocolate comes from a seed.  This month we talk a little about one of Belize’s favorite foods, Conch; where it lives, how its caught, how its cooked and how… it’s a snail!

If you are eating conch in Belize, you are most likely eating Queen Conch. Horse Conch or mai mula as it is locally known is also eaten especially in ceviche but sadly it is now rare and considered a delicacy. Queen Conch is a large sea snail that can be found close to the reef in shallow water in the sand or seagrass.  Conch don’t like to stay in one place and tend to travel miles looking for food. They move about in groups or schools using their “foot” to drag them across the sandy sea bottom.

Local fishermen are skilled at knowing where to find them and only those with a commercial fishing license are allowed to catch them. They are relatively easy to catch but extracting what’s inside requires skill and precision. The fisherman makes a small hole in the spiral part of the shell preferably using another conch shell (a knife is liable to break). This hole breaks the vacuum inside the shell making the meat easy to extract. Once extracted it needs to be cleaned of all the brown skin, best done with a fillet knife.  The “nail” and eyes are normally discarded or kept as bait or to chum. Experienced Conch fisherman never throw the empty shells back into the same place they have caught the conch as other conch will not return to this place. Instead they wait until their catch is complete at the end of the day and throw the shells back in, where there aren’t any conch. That is why you often see piles of shells in one place.

Freshly extracted conch meat can be eaten immediately as its sweet and tender. The tough muscle or foot can be tenderized with a mallet so that it too can be consumed. Every local fisherman and chef have their own special recipe for conch ceviche but staple ingredients include conch meat of course, lime (lots of it) cilantro, onion, tomato and habanero pepper(if desired). Conch fritters, conch soup (which is known to be good for the back) and conch steak are the most popular dishes you will come across in Belize. However, if you want to ensure that you get to try one or all of these tasty dishes you need to visit between 1st October and 30th June which is open conch season. At all other times of the year, the fishing and serving of conch is forbidden in order to maintain the conch population. Luckily that time is now.



Mango Season. Cashew Season. No, it’s Chocolate Season!

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1430


May and June see the start most Belizeans favorite season, mango season. After eight months of deprivation, these sweet beauties suddenly grace every market stall and roadside vendor in Belize. The countryside and city yards overflow with mangoes of every shape and size, with colors ranging from green to red, to yellow and even blue.

In Belize, there are well over 20 varieties of mango with names just as colorful as their skin. There are Hairy mangoes, Blue mangoes, Garlic, Daddyfoot, Common, Number 11, Slippers, Julie and even Turpentine.

No. 11 Mango

There are four different stages of the mango, each with a very different taste. When it is green, the mango is hard and tart, delicious with salt and local habanero pepper, and is often used to make chutney. When its full or ‘turn’, the mango is just about ripe with a firm, slightly less sweet flesh, which is easy to eat and great in salads. Ripe mangoes are juicy and ready to eat with a delectable slightly perfumey aroma and taste. Overripe fruit is extremely messy and is best used to make mango juice. Add some lime, ice and a little bit of mint to it and you have a refreshingly delicious drink. The mango is paid homage to at an annual Mango Festival, in Hopkins in the Stann Creek District, usually at the beginning of June.


Belizeans love to celebrate the bounty of nature and the cashew is another fruit feted with its own festival. The Cashew Festival is held annually in Crooked Tree Village in late April or early May. Wait! It’s a fruit? Yes, the cashew is actually a very fragrant fruit with the more familiar nut hanging below. It grows wild in North Central Belize and flourishes despite the poor sandy soil in that region. It doesn’t need much water or fertilizer so it is indeed seen as miraculous. Harvest is generally between March and June where the trees are resplendent with red, orange and yellow that is the cashew fruit. Birds love the fruit as well, much to the chegrin of the farmers. It also makes a great wine.

Cashew fruit. ©

Here is a great video that tells you all about this fruit and nut!

Cashew SeasonStraight outa Crooked Tree and in time for cashew fest 2017.

Posted by 501Boyz Production on Wednesday, May 10, 2017


Did you know that chocolate was a fruit as well? Strictly speaking cacao (where chocolate comes from) is the actual fruit of the Theobrama tree. These colorful pods grow straight from the trunk or branch of the tree. Inside these pods are about 20 to 30 seeds covered in a thick sweet pulp that tastes nothing like chocolate, but is delicious all the same.  It’s the beans themselves that are taken from the pod, fermented in a box covered with banana leaves, dried and roasted.  Once roasted they are ground in a machine to release the oil (cocoa butter) which is put back into the cocoa mass to produce a liquor which will become chocolate as we know it.  The Cacao Festival a celebration of chocolate occurs annually in May in the Toledo District of Belize.


Belize Food

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 2265

Belize’s abundant cultural interaction makes for an incredible diversity of foods. As tourism has increased, so has the availability of international cuisine countrywide and whilst the mainstay of Belizean fare is undoubtedly stewed chicken, rice and beans served with plantain, potato salad or coleslaw, every region has at least one or two specialties based on its cultural heritage.

Corozal maintains a strong Mexican influence.  Corn is a staple here and used in the making of tamale, a corn based dough called masa surrounding chicken, wrapped in a banana or plantain leaf served with a juicy tomato based sauce. Traditionally the tamale was prepared by the ancient Maya for feasts.  Today they are eaten by everyone. Dukunu another delicacy is made from the ground and roasted corn kernels steamed in corn husks.

Making tamales over an open fire hearth: ©JCCUELLAR.COM

Most street corners in Belize towns, have their own taco stands and local favorites but Orange Walk arguably has the best. Tacos, a rolled corn tortilla with meat filling can be spicy or not, and make for a delicious breakfast. Orange Walk tacos are shipped countrywide by Tropic Air via our cargo department, so wherever it is likely that will be able to enjoy them or you can get them flown in specially.

Tacos in Orange Walk: © Tropic Air

The cuisine of Ambergris Caye one of the main tourist destinations of the country has absorbed influences from around the country and here you will find every kind of Belizean delicacy, as well as international cuisine, with an emphasis on seafood. With dishes ranging from Japanese sushi, to Italian pizza, to Salvadoran pupusas, your taste buds won’t be disappointed. Lobster and Conch are seasonal and the local specialty of ceviche, is usually made with either of these raw and then “cooked” with lime juice, cucumber and habanero pepper.

Shrimp Ceviche: ©JCCUELLAR.COM

In the South, in Placencia and the Cayo district, similar international cuisine is abundant whilst in Hopkins, and Dangriga (Stann Creek district), the traditional flavors reflect the strong Garifuna culture. Coconut milk, banana and plantain, fish and cassava root are all popular ingredients used to make the specialities of this region, which include Sere, a coconut based fish soup, and Hudut, consisting of mashed plantain.

As well as the staple, chicken with rice and beans,in Belize City, a diversity of fried chicken restaurants, offer a variation on a theme, creole and spicy, others oriental and crispy, all served with orange Fanta infused ketchup. With nicknames such as “kick down fence”, “Nice and Nasty”, “Freetown Kentucky” and “Greasy Bag”, who can resist this artery clogging indulgence!

Rice and Beans with Stew Chicken. ©

Healthier fare is on offer in the Toledo district, where the indigenous Maya have a mainstay diet of corn and beans and whatever else is grown on their farm. The Midday meal is often caldo a clear soup eaten with tortillas and accompanied by the Maya cacao drink Kukuh which is a mixture of ground cocoa beans, pepper, corn and water. Along with the Maya there is a strong East Indian influence here and the local spices are added to make delicious curry.

Throughout Belize you will find three countrywide staples. The “Johnny Cake” a heavy bread eaten plain or with ham/cheese or chicken, traditionally cooked over an open flame, “Fry Jacks” deep fried flour tortillas, or “Pepper”. No Belizean meal would be complete without a bottle of hot sauce made with habanero chile peppers. This stuff is addictive and once you’ve tried it you will have it on everything, just like the locals do and be sure to take a bottle home for your friends.

To Catch a Lobster!

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 1557
Contact Reservations at 226-2626 for details on our Belizean Summer Special.


Do you every wonder how that succulent juicy lobster tail arrived on your plate? Catching lobster is a little bit more complicated that catching a fish and involves a few more steps. We asked some local lobster fishermen to give us the low down on how to catch a lobster.

So, the million dollar question.. how do you catch a lobster?

There are two ways to catch a lobster: using a trap or using a hook.  The trap method is used in shallower water in areas such as Ambergris Caye and Caye Caulker. The second method is normally used further afield.  Lighters (a 30ft sailing sloop) sets sail for 10 to 15 days at a time with 6 to 7 fishermen and a boat load of ice.  These fishermen skin dive the outer reef and atolls and catch lobster with a hook stick or gaff.

What do the traps look like and how do they work?

The lobster trap is made from strips of wood from the palmetto palm. They are un baited and have a funnel on the top.  They are set in the open seagrass. The Caribbean or spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) which is nocturnal leaves the safety of the coral reef to find food and graze on these seagrass beds.  As soon as the sun comes up they are looking for a hiding space.  They aren’t the brightest of creatures and if they see any chance of shade such as a trap they will scurry down the funnel and then won’t be able to get out.
The shade trap is made of palmetto and corrugated roofing.  The lobsters hide under these shades. Tin Drums are also used as traps.

Who makes the traps?

The traps are made by the fishermen themselves.  This skill has been handed down from generation to generation.

When do you start to lay traps and how do you know where to put them?

At the beginning of June the traps, old and new are put in the sea to soak. This makes it easier for them to sink.  About a week before the beginning of lobster season the traps are situated. Each lobster fisherman has a fixed territory which is usually inherited from previous generations and on the whole other fishermen respect this. The secret to location and pattern of laying the traps is known only to the individual.

How big should the lobster be?

A whole lobster, must measure three inches or more from the eye to the start of the tail; the lobster tail should weigh at least 4 ounces.  There are big fines for being caught with undersized, spotted (which means the lobster will soon lay eggs ) or those with eggs .


How early do you get up on the first day of lobster season and how long do you catch lobster for?

At the break of day until about 10 am or until you have a good catch

Do you go out every day during lobster season?

Normally its every few days to check on the traps.  With a fast powerboat checking your traps doesn’t take that long.

Where do you sell your catch?

In times gone by the catch would be sold at the Fishermen’s Co-operatives which existed in the major towns of San Pedro, Caye Caulker, Placencia and others. In the past lobster was a big export and here in San Pedro a cargo plane full of ice would fly in to take the catch. Today the tourism industry has changed all that.  The co-operatives don’t really exist as before and fishermen tend to have an agreement with a hotel or restaurant, who will buy all their catch.

Lobster season this year opens on 15th June.

San Pedro, Caye Caulker and Placencia all stage Lobsterfests which for the lobster lover are a must!  Lobster abounds!! And Tropic Air can take you there.

A sweet treat for May

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 966


This month is a very special one for the Toledo district of Belize because it marks the 10th Anniversary of the Chocolate Festival of Belize.

Back in 2007 the first festival was founded originally as the Toledo Cacao Festival, with the idea of promoting this very unique district of Belize and the amazing cacao that grows here.  The then British company Green and Black who were buying the majority of the cacao for their “Maya Gold” bar, were one of the main sponsors of the event, along with the Toledo Cacao Growers Association (TCGA).  The event opened with the signature “Wine and Chocolate” evening.  All the cuisine was chocolate related and guests were treated to bars of “Maya Gold” as a welcome gift. The following day a street fair was held in the town of Punta Gorda, the town clock was painted especially for the event.  There were stalls of all kinds selling every kind of cacao related product you could think of, wine, vinegar, soaps, earrings and of course chocolate.  Local musicians played marimba and the Maya ceremonial deer dance was re-enacted. There were activities for children to learn all about cacao and even trips to local cacao farms could be arranged. The event culminated on the Sunday with fireworks and the music of The Three Kings.


The Maya of the Toledo district have of course been making chocolate for thousands of years. They discovered that if the seeds grown in the pods of the Theobrama Cacao tree were roasted and ground, mixed with local spices and water, that they provided a refreshing drink. This drink originally drunk in dried gourds is still very much a part of the Maya culture although today it is more likely to be drunk from brightly colored plastic cups.  This first ever cacao event was not only a showcase of the traditional Maya culture but also an inspiration for a handful of people to start making their own “bean to bar” chocolate within Belize using Belizean cacao. By the following year there were already four new chocolate makers in Belize, showcasing their products at the 2nd Cacao Festival.  These included Belize Chocolate Company, Cotton Tree Chocolate, Goss Chocolate and Ixcacao (originally Cyrila’s)


The Toledo Cacao Growers Association which was established in 1984 was the original source for buying beans.  Until very recently the cacao farmer would harvest the pods, extract the beans and then ferment them in wooden boxes covered with banana leaves. This process would take approximately 7 days.  Once the beans were fermented they were laid out to dry.  The TCGA would buy these dried and fermented beans from the farmer.  In 2010, Maya Mountain Cacao started purchasing wet beans from the farmers in an effort to provide a more consistent quality to the buyer.  The TCGA quickly followed suit and today both companies centralise the fermenting and drying of the cacao.  It is at this stage that the various chocolate makers buy the beans to transform it into chocolate.

The Cacao festival changed its name in 2013 to The Chocolate Festival of Belize.  As with years gone by, this year the event will be held on the Commonwealth weekend 20th – 22nd May and will follow the same format as the original with Wine and Chocolate evening on Friday, Taste of Toledo street fair  held on the Saturday and Grand Finale on Sunday.  Come and check out what promises to be a fabulous, informative weekend filled with chocolate, culture, music and fun and of course make sure you fly there on Tropic Air.

Christmas in Belize

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 955

Belize is a veritable melting pot of different races and cultures. At no time of the year is this more visible than at Christmas. Whilst the decorating of Christmas trees, lights and giving of presents is a countrywide occurrence, other traditions handed down from one culture and generation to another have been adopted, diluted and adapted over the years.

Amongst all Belizeans, Christmas is a time to clean house.  In preparation for expected or unexpected family and friends, the house is tidied, new curtains hung and often new flooring laid.  Albert Street in Belize City was traditionally the place to shop for new material, decorations and tiles. Today most towns stock these products.


In most major towns of each area the season kicks off with the lighting of the town Christmas tree in the town square, an event often accompanied by carol singing and other celebrations.  Already by this stage most shops have already put up their Christmas decorations and Christmas music in both Spanish,English and reggae versions can be heard belting merrily through the streets.


On Ambergris Caye, one of the highlights of Christmas is The lighted boat parade which usually takes place on the first Saturday of December.  This is a beautiful sight to behold as the local community pull together and an array of fishing boats, catamarans, tour boats, water taxis and barges take to the water lit up with Christmas lights and parade from north to south of the island.  It’s a great opportunity to grab a beachside seat in one of the many restaurants and bars and enjoy this festive seaside tradition.

In Dangriga in Southern Belize there is a strong Garifuna community and on Christmas afternoon it is traditional to watch or indeed take part in the Joncunu a colorful masquerade dance.  The performance is an imitation of the European slave masters as seen by the pink painted masks that the dancers wear and the white shirts and often skirts which parody Scottish kilts that the British used to wear. The dance is often accompanied by garifuna drumming.


Another grand tradition of Dangriga is The Grand Ball, an occasion which dates back to 1914 where dancers performed traditional ballroom dance steps such as the Fox Trot, Quadrille and the Waltz. This event continues today every Christmas and New Year’s Eve, largely attended by an older crowd.

Las Posadas is a mestizo tradition which occurs throughout communities in Belize but is strongly observed in Benque Viejo del Carmen.  The 9 day custom starts on 16th December with the statues of Mary and Joseph being taken from Church to someones home which is locked. This procession is usually accompanied by marimba music, candles and firecrackers.  Eventually after prayers and a reenactment of the nativity the doors are opened and the statues remain at the house for the evening.  The following few nights the statues are taken to other families.

In the Toledo district where the Maya influence is strong, the ancient ceremony known as Deer Dance is often performed traditionally at Christmas and other special occasions. The Dance is performed by 24 dancers in masks including a jaguar, deer, a hunter among other characters.


Belizeans love their turkey and ham for Christmas dinner and this is usually served with trimmings including stuffing and of course the Belizean favorite of rice and beans.  In certain cultures, tamales or relleno are served instead or in concert with the traditional Christmas dinner. Black fruit cake is a favorite Belizean dessert at this time.

Christmas is a really wonderful time to visit Belize.  The weather is warm , the welcome is warm and you will feel like family. And don’t forget to try the Rumpope!

Belize Navidad

Let’s go visit Toledo!

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 769

Toledo the southernmost district of Belize is arguably one of the richest areas of our country in terms of culture and topography.  Cradled by high mountains, dense jungle and the blue Caribbean sea, the area is abundant in nature reserves, pristine rainforests, extensive cave systems and some of the best off shore cayes and yet historically it is one of the least populated and visited.  Formerly frequented by the hardier eco traveler and backpacker,  Tropic Air’s daily scheduled flights from almost anywhere in Belize including the International airport, to Punta Gorda the areas capital ,coupled with the increase in a variety of accommodation ranging from luxury lodges to bed and breakfast inns has opened up this diverse area to the mainstream traveler. Visitors can even stay in a traditional Maya home in a thatched cottage in one of the many Maya villages.  This homestay project offers the chance to experience the Maya way of life. Food is authentic Maya fare of corn tortillas made on the fire, with corn ground on a traditional metate handed down over the centuries from family to family. This is served with caldo a tasty chicken stew with potatoes and vegetables grown on the family farm.

Deer Dance

Whilst the Toledo district like the rest of Belize, is culturally diverse, the Maya culture dominates here, more than any other area of Belize.  Some 30 villages inhabited by the Kekchi and the Mopan Maya dot the surrounding countryside. San Antonio located 25 miles outside of PG has one of the largest Mopan Maya communities in Central America and one of the centers for the annual deer dance.  Villagers wear colorful costumes and dance to marimba music.  The dance symbolizes the relationship between man and nature.  The Maya maintain a strong link to the past through rituals, folklore and family.  Fiestas dancing and traditional music remain important as several festivals and celebrations occur throughout the year.

Belize Chocolate Fetival - Wine & Chocolate NightThe most recent annual event is the Toledo Cacao Festival held in May in Punta Gorda and throughout the district.  Activities range from a wine and chocolate tasting evening to cookery competitions and a craft fair, trips to the outer Cayes and a cacao trail tour in Toledo’s chocolate country.
Other festivals in the district include the feast of San Luis during Easter, Garifuna settlement Day and the East Indian Festivals.  In October The Tide fish fest is a weekend annual event dedicated to raising awareness of environmental issues.  The weekend consists of a seafood gala with delicious food on offer, a youth conservation competition and a fishing tournament.

Annual TIDE Fish Festival

In November the Battle of the drums showcases local musicians as they display their talents in 5 different categories of Garifuna drumming.

Tasty food in San Ignacio

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 643

Much of traveling has to do with finding great places to please your taste buds. In Belize the choices are wide and delightful and San Ignacio is certainly a destination that delivers on this.  Sure, San Ignacio a great destination for a range of tourist activities like spelunking, Maya Archaeological exploration, horse back riding, canoeing and more but doing all those wonderful activities work up an appetite.

Tropic Air is the only airline that can take you to experience these delights in San Ignacio. Book with us today and check out the following blog from Lorenzo Gonzalez on details about your food options that will have your mouth watering.

See you on the next flight ;).

BOOK NOW: Call our reservations at 226-2012, drop us an email at or do it right from our website on the left side.

BLOG: San Ignacio, Cayo’s best food spots.

Insider Tips to Belize from Tropic Air

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 777

Think outside the box. September and October are some of the best months of the year for diving. Fewer people visit and you are sure to find great deals on accommodation.


SCUBA Diving Belize - Tropic Air
©Belize Tourism Board


Put “visit at least one Maya site” on your to do list. There are sites in each of the 6 Belize districts.


Lamanai Tour with Tropic Air
@Belize Tourism Board


Snorkeling the 2nd largest barrier reef is a must, but be sure to wear a rashguard or t-shirt as the reflection of the water will increase the effect of the sun’s rays.


Hol Chan Marine Reserve Tour with Tropic Air
@Belize Tourism Board


Fly rather than drive. Tropic Air has flights to most destinations and also offer charters to more remote and exotic places.


Tropic Air - the airline of Belize


Belizeans love to party and there are festivals and celebrations countrywide most months of the year. Check with the Belize Tourism Board to find out what’s going on when you plan to visit.

Belize City Carnival - Tropic Air

Talk to the locals and find out where they eat.


Local Food - Tropic Air


Go visit the Belize Zoo -known as the coolest little zoo in the world, you will see an amazing selection of Belizean wildlife in their natural habitat.


Zipline & Belize Zoo Tour with Tropic Air


Caving can be fun! Try a relaxing tubing trip through a cave system or for something more adventurous, visit one of the caves traditionally thought of as part of the Maya underworld.

Tropic Air Cave Tubing & Airboat Tour

You really cannot miss the famous Blue Hole if you come to Belize. If you don’t want to dive or snorkel it, then see it by air. Tropic Air can take you there. It’s on most peoples bucket list!


Blue Hole Tour with Tropic Air
©Jose Luis Zapata


If you are based on the mainland for your vacation, try to take at least one trip to the Cayes. Tropic Air flies to Ambergris Caye and Caye Caulker


Caye Caulker with Tropic Air


If you are based on the Cayes try to take a trip to the mainland to experience all it has to offer. Tropic air can take you there. (link to Destinations page)

Belize City with Tropic Air
Make sure you try the national dish of Belize – stewed chicken, rice and beans with coleslaw at least once on your trip… and I bet you won’t be able to just have it once.

Lobserfest in Belize

Posted By : Tropic Air/ 558

Belize is famous for its spiny lobster (called crayfish locally), whose harvest season begins annually on June 15th.  This date also marks the celebration of all things lobster including three festivals held in three Belizean communities.

The beach towns of Caye Caulker and Placencia have traditionally had lobsterfests and in recent years, San Pedro, Ambergris Caye has added one to its calendar as well. If you are lucky visit Belize in June, you will be able to experience at least one of these delicious events.

San Pedro Lobsterfest is a week-long event usually starting with a kick-off party and culminating in a grand fiesta in Central Park. During the week, there are events planned all over town including a lobster crawl that involves partaking in lobster delicacies and libations in a series of establishments on a given night.  One can obtain a “lobster passport”, where each day a different island establishment is represented and acquisition of a lobster “stamp” in this passport renders the holder eligible for the grand prize, drawn on the final night’s event in Central Park. The prize is usually vacation for the following year that includes tickets from Tropic Air. The final block party is a lobster lovers delight. Front Street is closed to traffic and most of the local restaurants have booths serving their rendition of the tasty crustacian. There is a competition for the best dish so culinary imagination knows no bounds. There is some serious deliciousness to be found here, all accompanied by local musicians to give the real party atmosphere.

Caye Caulker lobsterfest is a weekend event. This is a local Belizean favorite, and people flock here from all over the country.  Stalls and restaurants everywhere offer anything from lobster tacos to barbecued lobster.

Placencia’s festival is also a weekend event and, in their own words, promises  “a mega beach party like no other in Belize “ with live music, family games, a legendary raffle and of course more lobster than it is possible to eat.

If you want to enjoy lobster, then come during the open season because between February 15th and June 14th, the crustacean is off the menu. This means that fishermen are not allowed to catch it, restaurants are not allowed to sell it and it is illegal to have in your possession.  Whilst this is harsh for the many tourists and locals, it is necessary to preserve this valuable resource for the future.

If you are planning a trip to Belize and you love lobster then June is definitely the month to come visit. Book your travel with Tropic Air.